Data Collection: Choosing Sources (People, Places, and Things).   
Required Readings
Ravitch, S. M., & Carl, N. M. (2016). Qualitative research: Bridging the conceptual, theoretical, and methodological. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Chapter 4, “Design and Reflexivity in Data Collection” (pp. 111–144)
Table 4.3, “Purposeful Sampling Strategies” (pp. 129–137)
Rubin, H. J., & Rubin, I. S. (2012). Qualitative interviewing: The art of hearing data (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Chapter 3, “Qualitative Data-Gathering Methods and Style” (previously read in Week 3)
Patton, M. Q. (2015). Chapter 5, Module 30: Purposeful sampling and case selection: Overview of strategies and options. In Qualitative research and evaluation methods (4th ed., pp. 264–315). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Guest, G., Bunce, A., & Johnson, L. (2006). How many interviews are enough? An experiment with data saturation and variability. Field Methods, 18(1), 59–82.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Mason, M. (2010). Sample size and saturation in PhD studies using qualitative interviews. Forum Qualitative Social Research Sozialforschung, 11(3).
Yob, I., & Brewer, P. (n.d.). Working toward the common good: An online university’s perspectives on social change, 1-25.
Document: Video Field Notes Guide (Word document)
Use this guide to help you as you take notes for your Scholar of Change video.
Required Media
Scholar of Change Video #4
Topper, C. (2014). Christin Topper, PhD student, bringing the natural world to Hong Kong [Video file].
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 2 minutes.
What is a good sample in qualitative research? It is NOT about size or generalizability.
To prepare for this Discussion:
Review the Guest, Bunce, and Johnson article; the Yob and Brewer article; and the Learning Resources related to sampling and saturation for this week.
Prepare a critique of the sampling strategy used by Yob and Brewer (n.d.). Include the following your critique:
The purpose of the study

Data Collection: Choosing Sources (People, Places, and Things)